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Landschaftsfotografie podcast about previous biggest mistakes and lessons learned

50. Landschaftsfotografie Podcast

Some weeks ago Alex (Homepage) featured me and our buddy Jonas Piontek (Instagram / Facebook) in an episode where we would talk about our biggest fails or mistakes in photography and what we learned along the way. Most of the time we screwed up we even have been on a photography trip together which made the retrospective more fun.

It’s a quite spontaneous and less scripted fun episode Alex wanted to have for the 50th anniversary of his “Landschaftsfotografie Podcast”.
There is only one caveat: Unfortunately the episode is in German language.

Enjoy the show 😉

50 Folgen Landschaftsfotografie Podcast – Jubiläum mit Jonas Piontek und Philipp Lutz

 

Sirui tripod repairs – part 3

This is a continuation of my ” Sirui tripod repairs” series:

After being happy with my Sirui  M-3204X tripod for a little bit over a year after the last incident (block sliding of leg sements) I faced another issue which had to do with blocked sliding, this time the culprit was the middle column, which was not sliding smoothly anymore.

In the following pictures you can see how a screw is looking out of its hole and the sliding notch clearly took some damage already.

It took me a couple of weeks until the Sirui Germany support responded to my e-Mail asking for repairs. After I finally got an answer, I got offered a new middle column, because the current one was beyond repair.

Once again I was surprised that the service offered me free repairs for a tripod which is almost 7 years old and discontinued. Sirui tripods might not be the most sturdy (only compared with the very expensive competitors like Gitzo), but at least you’ll always get treated with free repairs. So I’m still happy with my Sirui, as it’s still fine for my usage as a hobby photographer, it might be different for a professional though.

Calendar 2020

Surprise surprise, there will be a calendar for next year again!
If you are interested and have not yet a new wall calendar for next year or you’re already looking for Christmas gifts go ahead and drop me a message below or write me an e-Mail at kontakt@philipp-lutz.net.
 
It’s a matte print on premium paper in A3 format.
 
It will be 20€ for the calendar + 4€ shipping (DE). If you live outside of Germany just ask me for the shipping costs.

 

New gallery “Concrete Jungles of Tokyo” is up

Some time ago I was browsing my images from my last trip to Tokyo during Winter of 2015.
While browsing I discovered many unedited pictures and decided to make a series out of them because they all follow a consistent theme and unlike my previous modern architecture photos they are in colour. Please have a look at the Concrete Jungles of Tokyo – Gallery.

And here I give you a little teaser:

 

The quest to find a new camera bag for long hikes – part 2

This is a follow up on my previous post from 2016, after having made more experience and more thoughts about this topic.

Here is just a not so short recap on this topic:

I’ve always been struggling with a good solution to pack away camera equipment during long hiking trips which might take several days. On the one hand it’s practical if you use one of the present ICU systems by f-stop or Mindshift backpacks , however it has the disadvantage that those backpack internal camera bags are note very flexible when it comes to only carrying them for a couple of meters. Let me give you an example:
On a multi-day hike camp is set up in the afternoon, the tent is pitched and all camping related stuff resides in the tent or next to it, while the camera gear needs to be available for sunset or night shooting which might happen 1-2km away from the camping spot. Surely you can empty your backpack completely and only carry the camera gear in it for strolling around next to the camping area, however it comes with additional effort of re-packing which can be quite annoying on a week-long hiking trip. ICUs from f-stop at least can be detached from the backpack and carried with both hands or with a simple shoulder bag. This already gives a lot of flexibility for different packing styles and workflows, but it’s not there yet. I’d like to have the flexibility to carry an ICU either in the backpack or outside of the backpack, for example in front of me, like a slingshot shoulder bag or a bumbag. This gives you the freedom to have quick access to your camera gear during the hike and might enable you to get photos you otherwise wouldn’t have taken because of the hassle to get the camera gear out of your big backpack.

 

Back to today:

I’ve been on several long hiking trips since 2016, like on Yakushima in Japan and Tasmania in 2017, several multi-day hiking trips in the Alps and my recent 8-day hike trough the Drakensberg area in South Africa.
I’m still using the solution mentioned in my previous post, having a big Deuter 70L backpack and cheap shoulder bag which I can either carry in front of me by hanging it on the backpack carry system over both shoulders

What I noticed on each hike is the strap of the shoulder bag compromises the carry system of the backpack by putting weight on the load balancing straps next to the shoulders and hence prevents the carry system from putting more weight on the hip belt, which might be convenient at times when you want to carry the backpack away from your back. This is not catastrophic, but not good either, especially on very long hikes.
That’s why I recently looked into other solutions which allow you to carry a camera bag on your waist like bumbags. I want to try out the bags listed below and will update the post once I have new insights or decided to change mit kit by choosing one of those bags.

Waistbags / Bumbags:

  • Manfrotto Street CSC camera Sling/Waist pack
    • Exterior dimensions (L x W x H): 32 x 12 x 23 cm
    • Interior dimensions (L x W x H):  30 x 11 x 20 cm
    • Weight: 0.58kg
    • Thoughts: TBD
  • Crumpler JP5500-001 Jackpack 5500
    • Exterior dimensions (L x W x H): 35 x 21 x 15 cm
    • Interior dimensions (L x W x H): 32 x 20 x 12.5 cm
    • Weight: 0,8kg
    • Thoughts: TBD
  • Mantona ElementsPro 20
    • Exterior dimensions (L x W x H): 19 x 24 x 17 cm
    • Interior dimensions (L x W x H): 17 x 22 x 15 cm
    • Weight: 0,72 kg
    • Thoughts: TBD
  • CAMSLINGER Outdoor
    • Exterior dimensions (L x W x H): 22 x 17.5 x 11 cm
    • Interior dimensions (L x W x H): 19 x 16 x 9 cm
    • Weight: 0,48 kg
    • Thoughts: TBD